Monday, March 24, 2014

10 Questions with...NYC Poet Aimee Herman

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Aimee Herman will be one of the featured poets in(as well as the host of) Raining Words: A Spring Poetry Extravaganza on Saturday, April 12 @ The Pomegrante Gallery, produced by 3Po3try NYC (https://www.facebook.com/3po3trynyc).

Herman is a performance artist, poet and teacher with an MFA in Creative Writing from Long Island University in Brooklyn, as well as a longtime Inspired Word host. She teaches at Bronx Community College and is a faculty member with Poetry Teachers NYC, offering affordable poetry workshops and creating spaces for other performers to lift their words off the page. She has been published in various journals and anthologies such as: Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics (Nightboat Books) and The Understanding Between Foxes and Light (great weather for MEDIA). Her full-length book of poems to go without blinking was published in 2012 by BlazeVOX books. She can be found wrapped in caution tape in Brooklyn or at aimeeherman.wordpress.com.

The following is our quick 10-question interview with Ms. Herman, who like poet e.e. cummings believes in writing all in lowercase:

What one word describes your writing style?

experimentallyserrated.

What's your idea of the perfect poem?

there is no such thing.

What's your best writing moment?

when the words arrive.

What's your worst writing moment?

when they forget themselves.

What time of the day do you mostly write?

all times.

What do you do to get into your writing sessions?

disembowel my brain stem, remove my clothes, eat nato with okra, masturbate, read, listen to miles davis (not necessarily in that order).

What's the weirdest place you ever wrote?

in a dungeon on a saturday surrounded by various forms of bdsm.

What's the weirdest thing you ever wrote on?

none of it's been weird. i'm just grateful that there are other things to write on besides paper. bodies. trees. buildings. bathroom doors. library books, refrigerators, on bread......

What book changed your writing forever?

blood and guts in high school by kathy acker.

What poet, dead or alive, would you like to be friends with?

tie between kathy acker and bukowski.

To purchase advance tickets to Raining Words: A Spring Poetry Extravaganza, go to http://3po3trynycdebut.eventbrite.com.

Photo credit: Jay Franco (http://jayfranco.co/).

Monday, March 17, 2014

10 Questions with...NYC Poet Graham Willner

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Graham Willner will be one of the featured poets in Raining Words: A Spring Poetry Extravaganza on Saturday, April 12 @ The Pomegrante Gallery, produced by 3Po3try NYC (https://www.facebook.com/3po3trynyc).

Born, raised, and still residing in Brooklyn, Willner is a pre-school teacher and poet who writes thoughtful pieces about the human condition. He says he “braids together semantics and syntax” to “rhythmically, metaphorically, and meaningfully point something out.” He finds himself most influenced by the “simple complexities of being human.”

The following is our quick 10-question interview with Graham:

What one word describes your writing style?

Metaphorocious (not a real word)

What's your idea of the perfect poem?

The perfect poem to me is based on a physiological response...when the back of your mind feels warms, your ears literally perk up, when goosebumps rise from your skin, tears form in the back of your eyes, and one side of your mouth smiles involuntarily.

What's your best writing moment? What's your worst writing moment?

My best and worst writing moments are hopefully both yet to come.

If you could steal one line from any poem, what would it be?

"Maybe there are cartwheels in your mouth, made they'll grow up to be gymnasts, maybe you've been kicking people with them by accident" - Andrea Gibson, A Letter to the Playground Bully

What time of the day do you mostly write?

I almost exclusively write while I'm on route to work...or going anywhere on the train. So, in the morning and the evening.

What do you do to get into your writing sessions?

I'll sometimes listen to a poem I want to emulate the sentiment of.

What's the weirdest place you ever wrote?

When I was the assistant teacher at a pre-school in Brooklyn, I would write during the children's nap time.

What's the weirdest thing you ever wrote on?

The underside of a giant water heater.

What book changed your writing forever?

I don't think any one book could change someone's writing "forever"... unless they never read another book again after that one...but I've been reading Salman Rushdie in hopes that it will effect my writing.

Do you have any writing superstitions? If so, what are they and how do you deal with them?

Yes...I superstitiously believe that the first way in which I phrase a line in a poem shouldn't be discarded...even if I've decided to re-phrase it. I deal with it by writing the line as it was originally phrased somewhere else.

To purchase advance tickets to Raining Words: A Spring Poetry Extravaganza, go to http://3po3trynycdebut.eventbrite.com.

Monday, March 10, 2014

10 Questions with...NYC Poet Alessandra Francesca

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Alessandra Francesca will be one of the featured poets in Raining Words: A Spring Poetry Extravaganza on Saturday, April 12 @ The Pomegrante Gallery, produced by 3Po3try NYC (https://www.facebook.com/3po3trynyc).

Born in Boston, poet Alessandra Francesca has been inspired by a range of artists, from T.S. Eliot to Humphrey Bogart, and her family feared she would run off to New York since before she could walk. She can be found mumbling poetry to herself on the L train and her work will strike you with its raw honesty and lasting poignancy. Her blog can be found @ http://ilsaseeksrick.com/. She lives in Brooklyn.

The following is our quick 10-question interview with Alessandra.

What's your idea of the perfect poem?

One that so begs to be read aloud it is eventually banned from libraries.

What was your best writing moment?

When I wrote my mother’s eulogy.

What was your worst writing moment?

Middle school. Studies show that 100% of Americans who dislike poetry cite
“That annoying girl in my 7th grade class” as the primary cause.

If you could steal one line from any poem, what would it be?

In the room the women come and go
Talking of Michelangelo. (from T.S. Eliot's The Love Song of J Alfred Prufrock)

What time of the day do you mostly write?

Obscenely early in the morning or maddeningly late at night.

What do you do to get into your writing sessions?

Fall in love, drink bourbon, or some combination thereof.

What's the weirdest place you ever wrote?

In a hotel room in Venice. The story starts with a tomato and ends with a fig.

What's the weirdest thing you ever wrote on?

My bedroom ceiling.

What book changed your writing forever?

Choke, by Chuck Palahniuk.

What poet, dead or alive, would you like to be friends with?

Neruda, so I could catch his cast-offs on the rebound.

To purchase advance tickets to Raining Words: A Spring Poetry Extravaganza, go to http://3po3trynycdebut.eventbrite.com.

Photo Credit: Jay Franco (http://jayfranco.co/)

Monday, March 3, 2014

10 Questions with...NYC Poet Danny Matos

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Danny Matos will be one of the featured poets in Raining Words: A Spring Poetry Extravaganza on Saturday, April 12 @ The Pomegrante Gallery, produced by 3Po3try NYC (https://www.facebook.com/3po3trynyc).

Native New Yorker Danny Matos is a spoken word poet who began performing in the fall of 2012. Since then, he has featured and performed at various venues and schools throughout New York. In 2013, he was the winner of the $1000 Poetry Idol contest and the co-winner of The Inspired Word Poetry Slam Championship. He believes words and expression give us all a purpose bigger than ourselves, as well as foster one of humanity's most precious needs - a sense of genuine connection to ourselves, each other, and the world at large. He released his first book of poetry late last year, Scratching the Surface. His website can be found @ http://dannymatos.com/.

The following is our quick 10-question interview with Mr. Matos:

What one word describes your writing style?

Clever

What's your idea of the perfect poem?

One that is honest.

What's your best writing moment?

When I’m writing just for me.

What's your worst writing moment?

When I catch myself writing for someone else, to please, or placating to others’ expectations of what writing looks life.

If you could steal one line from any poem, what would it be?

Who threw their watches off the roof to cast their ballot for Eternity outside of Time & alarm clocks fell on their head every day for the next decade… -Howl: Allen Ginsberg

Ask me another day and it will be different.

What time of the day do you mostly write?

I truly enjoy writing as soon as I wake up or really late at night, well after my day is over. But I tend to write all day (at least I’m mindful of what I’m writing all day).

What do you do to get into your writing sessions?

I like to sit in silence for a few minutes beforehand.

What's the weirdest place you ever wrote?

A funeral.

What's the weirdest thing you ever wrote on?

A plastic bag.

What book changed your writing forever?

It's between either The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho or 48 Laws of Power by Robert Greene.

To purchase advance tickets to Raining Words: A Spring Poetry Extravaganza, go to http://3po3trynycdebut.eventbrite.com.

Photo Credit: Jay Franco (http://jayfranco.co/)

Monday, February 24, 2014

10 Questions with NYC Poet Roya Marsh

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Roya Marsh will be one of the featured poets in Raining Words: A Spring Poetry Extravaganza on Saturday, April 12 @ The Pomegrante Gallery, produced by 3Po3try NYC (https://www.facebook.com/3po3trynyc).

Marsh works as a preschool teacher and youth mentor, but has always had a passion for writing. As a spoken word poet, she brings a heartfelt intensity and deep beliefs to the stage, brandishing a saber of light that will penetrate those dark pockets of prejudice, injustice, and hurt, that lay buried deep within each of us. In 2013, she was the co-winner of The Inspired Word Poetry Slam Championship, a finalist in the Poetry Idol contest, and placed runner-up in the Nuyorican Poets Café Grand Slam finals. She has been featured at a slew of venues and college throughout New York and New Jersey, as well as in Pennsylvania and DC. Marsh hopes her poems will spark change. "If you want to leave an impact deep enough for future generations to see," she says, "start now." Her website can be found @ http://www.royamarsh.com/.

The following is our quick 10-question interview with Ms. Marsh:

What one word describes your writing style?

Free

What's your idea of the perfect poem?

There is no perfect poem, as there is no perfect poet. If you can break open and have your audience bleed with you and suture the wounds by the end of the poem, you're pretty damn close, to me at least.

If you could steal one line from any poem, what would it be?

I'd much rather be inspired than to imitate.

What's your best writing moment?

Every chance I get to write.

What's your worst writing moment?

When I let the world into my head.

What time of the day do you mostly write?

I write every day. Whenever I have a thought, I do my best to get it down.

What's the weirdest place you ever wrote?

The bathroom.

What's the weirdest thing you ever wrote on?

Napkins at a bar.

What book changed your writing forever?

The Lorax.

What poet, dead or alive, would you like to be friends with?

Jack Kerouac.

To purchase advance tickets to Raining Words: A Spring Poetry Extravaganza, go to http://3po3trynycdebut.eventbrite.com.

Photo Credit: Jay Franco (http://jayfranco.co/)



Friday, February 7, 2014

Poem: The Healer by Arda Itez

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The Healer

What ails you, dearest child
Can you not see why you are here?
You are not of this realm
So embrace this precious gift
What pains you sweet, sweet girl
Have you yet to find your place?
Or have you seen what lies before you?
Fear etched upon your face

Ah, but you do know
In the darkest corner of your heart
This is the path you've returned for
To complete what you've begun
As you are a guiding light
For the broken, tortured soul
A muse for their redemption
The hand for each to hold

Rise up little girl
Mind the seeds that you have sown
For mortality is fleeting
And this life is not your own.

- Arda Itez